5 million die every year because they do NOTHING!


The Lancet on July 18th released a paper that includes a series of studies that highlight how little physical activity most people worldwide actually get and how dire the health consequences are. The fascinating study published just in time for the Olympics that commences on the 27th of this month, very carefully compares countries’ rates of physical activity. A . The study it describes, led by Pedro Hallal of the Federal University of Pelotas, is the most complete portrait yet of the world’s busy bees and couch potatoes. Dr Hallal and his colleagues pooled data from health surveys for 122 countries, home to 89% of the world’s population. They found that 31% of adults do not get enough physical activity—defined as 30 minutes of moderate exercise, five days a week, or 20 minutes of vigorous exercise three days a week, or some combination of the two. Women tend to get less exercise—34% are inactive, compared with 28% of men—but there are exceptions and regional variations, as the maps below show. Women in Russia, Croatia, Luxembourg, Greece and Iraq (to name a few) move more than their male counterparts. Malta wins the race for the most slothful nation, with 72% of adults getting too little exercise. Swaziland and Saudi Arabia slouch close behind, with 69%. In Bangladesh, by contrast, just 5% of adults fail to get enough exercise. Surprisingly, America does not live up to its sluggish reputation. Six in ten Americans are sufficiently active, compared with less than four in ten Britons. The figures are very alarming. Another paper in the Lancet elaborates on how a sedentary life is about as threatening to life expectancy as smoking.

Some of the most troubling conclusions reveal that roughly three of every ten individuals aged 15 years or older—about 1·5 billion people—do not reach present physical activity recommendations. The situation in adolescents is even more worrying, with a worldwide estimate that four of every five adolescents aged 13—15 years do not meet present guidelines. As summarised by Lee and colleagues these individuals are at increased risk of coronary heart disease, diabetes, some types of cancer, several other diseases, and premature death.

So don’t just sit there, start moving!
Asian Heart charts you an action plan that will help you stay physically active and guarantee fitness for life in its next blog. Coming soon.

For more information on diet, health and nutrition, please email Harpinder Gill at harpinder.gill. You are welcome to email us with any question on any health topic. Please allow 24 hours for an answer, and if your query seems requiring an urgent response, expect to hear from us before that time.

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5 million die every year because they do NOTHING!


The Lancet on July 18th released a paper that includes a series of studies that highlight how little physical activity most people worldwide actually get and how dire the health consequences are. The fascinating study published just in time for the Olympics that commences on the 27th of this month, very carefully compares countries’ rates of physical activity. A . The study it describes, led by Pedro Hallal of the Federal University of Pelotas, is the most complete portrait yet of the world’s busy bees and couch potatoes. Dr Hallal and his colleagues pooled data from health surveys for 122 countries, home to 89% of the world’s population. They found that 31% of adults do not get enough physical activity—defined as 30 minutes of moderate exercise, five days a week, or 20 minutes of vigorous exercise three days a week, or some combination of the two. Women tend to get less exercise—34% are inactive, compared with 28% of men—but there are exceptions and regional variations, as the maps below show. Women in Russia, Croatia, Luxembourg, Greece and Iraq (to name a few) move more than their male counterparts. Malta wins the race for the most slothful nation, with 72% of adults getting too little exercise. Swaziland and Saudi Arabia slouch close behind, with 69%. In Bangladesh, by contrast, just 5% of adults fail to get enough exercise. Surprisingly, America does not live up to its sluggish reputation. Six in ten Americans are sufficiently active, compared with less than four in ten Britons. The figures are very alarming. Another paper in the Lancet elaborates on how a sedentary life is about as threatening to life expectancy as smoking.

Some of the most troubling conclusions reveal that roughly three of every ten individuals aged 15 years or older—about 1·5 billion people—do not reach present physical activity recommendations. The situation in adolescents is even more worrying, with a worldwide estimate that four of every five adolescents aged 13—15 years do not meet present guidelines. As summarised by Lee and colleagues these individuals are at increased risk of coronary heart disease, diabetes, some types of cancer, several other diseases, and premature death.

So don’t just sit there, start moving!
Asian Heart charts you an action plan that will help you stay physically active and guarantee fitness for life in its next blog. Coming soon.

For more information on diet, health and nutrition, please email Harpinder Gill at harpinder.gill. You are welcome to email us with any question on any health topic. Please allow 24 hours for an answer, and if your query seems requiring an urgent response, expect to hear from us before that time.

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